Royal wedding inspires Greenwich designer’s floral fascinators

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Royal wedding inspires Greenwich designer’s floral fascinators

They can be showy or simple, tower above the pate or rest serenely across those locks. When made with nature’s blooms and blossoms, they become downright woodland chic. “It’s floral couture to wear,” flower designer Trish O’Sullivan says of the style of millinery known as the fascinator. O’Sullivan, who launched her career in New York City more than 22 years ago, recently opened the Floral Design Studio at Greenwich’s Garden Education Center. If these au courant headpieces have not snuck into your cultural consciousness by now you a.) don’t know who Catherine, the Duchess of Cambridge (a.k.a. Kate Middleton) is. b.) did not watch her wedding to Prince William. c.) have no interest in events that attract Britain’s royalty and aristocrats, d.) do not watch high-stakes horse races for the fashions d.) don’t like hats. FILE – In this Friday, April 29, 2011 file photo, Britain’s Prince William, foreground left, and his wife Kate, the Duchess of Cambridge, foreground right, during their wedding service at Westminster Abbey in London. With less than a month to go till she marries Prince Harry at Windsor Castle on May 19, Meghan Markle would most likely have chosen her wedding dress – though what it looks like is expected to remain a top secret until the last minute. Princess Diana’s 1981 wedding gown, with its puff sleeves, romantic ruffles and dramatic train, defined the ‘80s fairytale bridal look. More recently, when Kate Middleton married Prince William in 2011, the long-sleeved lace gown she chose sparked a trend for more covered-up, traditional lace bridal dresses that lasted years. These fancy headpieces have been around for some time, in one form or another, but within the past 25 years or so have seen a resurgence on both sides of the pond. Middleton is largely credited with making them more modern and hip, but the United States has their style leaders, too, including Lady Gaga and Sarah Jessica Parker. Bound with clips, combs or a band, at times they appear to defy gravity, perched precariously on one side of the head. Some of the top designers behind the resurgence include Irish milliner Philip Treacy and Britain’s Stephen Jones. Style watchers anticipate a bounty of sinamay straw, ribbons, feathers, jewels, blooms and structural engineering feats atop the heads of the guests at the nuptials of Britain’s Prince Harry and American actress Meghan Markle on May 19. “These hats really express personalities and are typically very gorgeous,” O’Sullivan says of the forms, which do not cover a woman’s entire noggin, making them ideal in preserving the glam blowout — another leading style trend. For a floral designer, they are a canvas full of possibilities. “This is truly wearable floral art,” says O’Sullivan, who has decided to honor the nuptials with her own wedding party. On May 19, the same day the couple is expected to say their “I dos” at St. George’s Chapel at Windsor Castle, O’Sullivan will preside over a fascinator workshop. Participants will be guided in […]