WHAT’S FRESH AND NEW IN BOUQUETS

A LOOK AT THE LATEST TRENDS FROM BOUQUET MAKERS, AS SEEN AT THIS SUMMER’S IFE SHOW IN CHICAGO.

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WHAT’S FRESH AND NEW IN BOUQUETS

By Christine Wright

At Super Floral, we wanted to find out what’s hot, new and fresh in the world of bouquets, so we talked to some of the leading bouquet makers that exhibited at this summer’s International Floriculture Expo (IFE) and beyond. Here’s what we found.

BOUQUET STYLES

Nature’s Flowers’ Paul Miller, AIFD, PFCI, shares that many consumers currently favor a more handpicked, natural and straight-from-the-garden look. These bouquets tend to have fewer ingredients and colors and an overall “earthier” feel.

Additionally, Miller says that shoppers are gravitating toward bouquets with more depth and dimension, with some flowers tucked in a bit deeper, some farther out – as opposed to all flowers on the same plane or at the same height in a bouquet.

THE COLORS OF THE RAINBOW

Lane DeVries, CEO of Sun Pacific Bouquet/The Sun Valley Group in Arcata, Calif., says, “Monochromatic [tints, tones and shades of one hue] is still king. This is due to supermarkets focusing their merchandising efforts on color blocking. It really is a great look.”

Miller concurs, adding, “The latest trend is fewer colors in bouquets – only one, two or three colors of flowers – monochromatic, dichromatic or analogous [three colors next to each other on a color wheel]. Colors are blended to create a coherent, eye-pleasing harmony.”

At the other end of the spectrum, many customers are still opting for polychromatic (multicolored) bouquets, Miller notes, with either softer pastel hues or vivid, bright color combinations, often with dyed or painted flowers/foliages.

WHAT’S FRESH AND NEW IN BOUQUETS

POPULAR BLOOMS AND VARIETY

Flowers once considered “premium” or “specialty” are making their way into consumer bouquets, and customers love it. Miller says that luxurious garden roses, spray roses, peonies, Dahlias, Hydrangeas, Proteas and more are making inroads in high-end supermarket floral departments, as well as Scabiosa and Ranunculus, both of which are available in exciting new varieties, flower forms and colors; novelty varieties of Dianthus barbatus (sweet William); and micro Gerberas (Piccolini brand).

DeVries adds that consumers are leaning toward bouquets with personality. “Exciting flowers such as Kalanchoe, Astilbe, hybrid lilies and Irises are very popular. Adding unique botanicals such as Cotinus [smoke bush], Brassica [kale] and Crocosmia [montbretia] create a lot of visual interest,” DeVries explains.

Succulents also are wildly popular currently and bring new form, texture and color to consumer bouquets.

Another trend in the bouquet world is to include just one stem of several types of flowers. For example, a 10-stem bouquet might have 10 different types of flowers, with no duplication.

WHAT’S FRESH AND NEW IN BOUQUETS

SIZE MATTERS

One of the more popular trends in the market today is miniature/petite bouquets, which are smaller in diameter, have shorter stem lengths and comprise smaller blooms. Most bouquet companies are now offering these cute little bunches, and they are incredibly versatile and perfect for self-purchase, last-minute gifts, or placement on an office desk or a nightstand, for example. Miniature/petite bouquets might be available at lower price points (but not always) than larger, more traditional bouquets, depending on types and quantities of flowers used.

New miniature varieties of some flower types are currently being grown especially for bouquets. Micro Gerberas and mini/micro spray roses, Irises and Scabiosa are just some of the interesting blooms that go into these bunches.

In addition, many bouquet makers are offering bouquets with shorter, more convenient stem lengths so that consumers can more easily drop them into vases, with little or no trimming or arranging necessary.

Ela Cymak, of The Elite Flower in Miami, Fla., explains that there are some challenges to retailers in this small bouquet trend: Stores must invest in displays tailored for mini bouquets. “A lot of thought is being put into the development of these fun bouquets, how to economically display and sell them, and how to make them affordable for consumers.” Ela says.

CONTAINERS

Also gaining popularity in the bouquet world is “vased” bouquets – beautiful bouquets sold in pretty vases, ready for consumers to grab and go, and give or display as is. Additionally, companies such as FlowerBox, in Portland, Ore., are making earth-friendly, recyclable, paper-based containers in vibrant colors that are easy to ship and store and are perfect for add-on sales to bouquet purchases.

DIY

Consumer bunches (small packages of individual flower and foliage types) appeal to the do-it-yourself trend. Many DIYers like to select small bunches of individual flower and foliage types to create their own bouquets and arrangements.

In the world of bouquets, there is something for everyone, and bouquet makers are always on top of trends and listening to what consumers want in their bunches.

1. A pastel polychromatic bouquet with micro Gerberas and spray roses from Nature’s Flowers.
2. Premium blooms, including Leucadendron, micro Gerberas and spray roses, hybrid tea roses, novelty Dianthus barbatus and Eucalyptus, abound in bouquet from The Elite Flower, creating a complementary color scheme.
3. This vivid, analogous-hued, fall-flavored bouquet from Sun Pacific Bouquet/The Sun Valley Group features premium hybrid lilies with sunflowers, asters, and reddish-brown Cotinus foliage.